Osteoporosis

Our bones are living tissue that give our body structure, allow us to move and protect our organs. Osteoporosis is a condition where bones become thin and  lose their strength. This can lead to fractures, which cause pain and make everyday activities extremely difficult. After a hip fracture, about one-quarter of people die or never walk again. 

It’s estimated over 200 million women have osteoporosis. That’s more than the combined populations of the Germany, the United Kingdom and France.

Worldwide, one in three women and one in five men over the age of fifty will experience an osteoporotic fracture.

In fact, every three seconds a bone will break, somewhere in the world, because of this disease.

Many people won’t know they have osteoporosis until their first fracture, which is why it’s called the ‘silent disease’. Even after a break, it often goes untreated.

The good news is osteoporosis can be diagnosed and treated and fractures often prevented through healthy lifestyle choices and appropriate medication for those in need.
 

Our Bone Health Advocates

Juliet Compston, former IOF board member

Since a first fracture is rapidly followed by more fractures, it is critical that healthcare policies promote the detection of osteoporosis before the first fracture occurs. 

EU Commissioner for Health Androulla Vassiliou in a video message on World Osteoporosis Day 2009

I am pleased to express support and commitment from the EU Commission to the millions of people suffering from osteoporosis and their families all over the world.

Martial Enguehard, Master chef

Food rich in calcium and vitamin D can help us to build strong bones and reduce the risk of osteoporosis. Cheese is rich in calcium. I live in France. We have more than 400 varieties of cheese! I enjoy cooking healthy food which includes vitamin D and calcium. Think to do the same at home. Bone Appétit!